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On This Day in Black History: March 28
1799
Slavery was abolished in New York.
1804
Ohio passed a law restricting the movement of blacks.
1866
President Andrew Johnson vetoed the Civil Rights Act of 1866. Passed over a presidential veto on April 9, the law subsequently became the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
1900
The British demanded that the Ashanti surrender the Golden Stool.
1984
Minister, noted educator and civil rights leader Dr. Benjamin E. Mays died. Mays was president of Morehouse College for 27 years.
1994
Supporters of the Zulu Inkatha Freedom Party and the African National Congress clashed in the streets of Johannesburg, leaving 18 dead.

Today's Featured Page
The Shona
The ruins of Great Zimbabwe still stand near the modern town of Masvingo in present-day Zimbabwe. They are three hundred feet long and two hundred feet wide. The walls are thirty feet high and, in many cases, twenty feet thick. They are the symbol of important political and economic developments among the Shona-speaking peoples in the twelfth century. More...


Previously Featured Pages
Shaka
At age 23, Shaka was conscripted into the Izi-cwe regiment of the army of Dingiswayo, the Mtetwa king. It was during this period that he developed the fighting techniques that made his warriors terrorize southeastern Africa. More...

Augusta Savage
Born Augusta Fells in 1892 in Green Cove Springs, Florida, Augusta Savage was one of the luminaries of the Harlem Renaissance. More...

Saartje (Sara) Baartman
When Saartje (Sara) Baartman left the shores of Africa, little did she know that her body parts would be returned to her home land 187 years later and that she would fuel the racist notions of black inferiority and black female sexuality in Europe. More...

African-American Astronauts
Guion S. Bluford became the first African-American to go into space in August 1983 aboard the Challenger. More...

Samori Ture
Born about 1830 in Sanankaro, a village southeast of Kankan in present-day Guinea, Samori Ture chose the path of confrontation, using warfare and diplomacy, to deal with the French colonial incursion into West Africa and established himself as the leading African opponent of European imperialism. More...

Rita Dove
Born 1952 in Akron, Ohio, Rita Dove served as the Poet Laureate of the United States and Consultant in Poetry at the United States Congress. She was the youngest person and the first African American to be appointed to this prestigious office. More...